Fes NC18: Mission 1

Reconnaissance: Participants interacted with multiple experiential stations aimed at revealing issues and neglected realities present in society

 

The Observatory: Scenes at home, involving broken families and the elderly

My group surveyed multiple stations depicting different scenes. First, the life of an elderly woman who lived alone and was searching for familial love. Next, we investigated how a space can be drastically transformed by the death of a loved one. And finally, how sexism could be hidden plainly. 

To me, the fresh perspectives revealed the parts of society I intentionally or unconsciously ignore. As we discussed our takeaways, I realised the most convenient answer in these situations were not always biblical. I say this because our first response frequently relied on logical or emotional appeals; using logic to combat misogynists or sympathy to counter abandonment. But truth be told, the answer to these conditions actually came, lived, died, and lived again two thousand-ish years ago.  

Now the reconnaissance is done. Time for action.

 

Written by Toby Seah, NUS VCF for Perspective October/November 2018 (FES newsletter)

 

The In-Between (a hidden set): The secrecy of the exhibits demonstrate how refugees can be easily neglected

The In-Between, which was a hidden station, left a deep impression on me. We were invited to step into tents, where refugees live, to read about the circumstances they are forced into and have a glimpse of having a tent as shelter. It was stuffy and claustrophobia-inducing – I remember skimming through the articles provided in hope of leaving the tent as quickly as I could for a breath of fresh air on the outside. 

As I stepped out, I saw the bright city lights and the safe, quiet roads of Singapore. Taking a few seconds half in the tent, half in my own reality, I felt an overwhelming sense of shame. I had read hurriedly and did not afford time and attention to this group of people; I took for granted the safe environment I am blessed with.

The In-Between revealed the invisibility of hidden communities. I learnt of them only through word of mouth or by paying close attention to them. The ones privy to this information are thus responsible to share or act on it. I left feeling heavy yet thankful that in God’s grace, for the first time, I felt genuine compassion for refugees. 

The reconnaissance, though brief, gave me a preliminary survey of my life. It forced me to come face-to-face with issues I would normally avoid. I see more clearly now, every facet of my life – at home, in relationships with others, commuting, engaging the in-betweens, technology use – has to be under the lordship of Jesus Christ.

 

Written by Rebecca Goh, NTU ECF for Perspective October/November 2018 (FES newsletter)

 

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